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Character study: RESENE


Let rebooted neutrals bring a multidimensional minimalism to your bedroom.

Styling by Vanessa Nouwens | Photography by Bryce Carleton. FURNISHINGS: Black frames from Kmart, art from Etsy/Art Design, duvet cover from Home Republic, pillowcases and cushions from Adairs, chair from Freedom Furniture, throw, cushion and rug from Città.

What are ‘character neutrals’ when they’re at home? You’re looking at a few of them. The Resene Tea paint used on this wall is one such colour, as is the floor in Resene Blanc.

The former is a complex river-boulder beige that’s perfect when pure white seems too harsh. The latter is a restrained Parisian white also available in versions from stronger-hued Resene Triple Blanc to the palest Resene Eighth Blanc.

Sitting perfectly within this palette is the warmed green-beige Resene Bison Hide on the bedside table and lampshade. The vase and frame in smoky, understated grey Resene Tapa bridge the gap between these paler character neutrals and the contrasting dark bowl and lamp base in ebonised Resene Black.

Painting accessories such as these is an affordable way to layer colour in an interior scheme and provides a satisfying creative project even a novice DIYer can pull off. To give an old bedside lamp or thrift store find a new attitude, remove the shade, bulb and fitting from the base, then gently sand
the base to give your paint something to stick to.

Painting your lampshade will be even easier – all you need is a brush and a Resene testpot. When choosing a colour, remember it’ll have an influence on the light the bulb casts. In a neutral sleep space such as this, a colour that’ll impart a warm, enveloping glow will maximise your character neutrals’ chameleonic potential and be the difference between blah and ta-dah.

Background in Resene Blanc with A4 drawdown paint swatches in (from top) Resene Eighth Fossil, Resene Tapa, Resene Bison Hide, Resene Tea, Resene Blanc, Resene Antidote and Resene White Linen; bowl in Resene Double Gravel; and vases in (from top) Resene Sandstone, Resene Quarter Drought and Resene Sandal.

 


 

Olive and let live: RESENE


Colour plays an undeniably important role in interior design. Each hue has the power to set the tone, mood and general ambiance. It also has the power to both give the illusion of space or make a space seem smaller than it is. Taking a brand-new-to-you hue onto your room’s major surfaces – your walls, floors, ceilings – is a sure-fire way to completely transform your space and breathe new life into your home.

 

Styling Vanessa Nouwens | Photography Melanie Jenkins

PAINT: Walls in Resene Waiouru, accent battens in Resene Gravel, floor in Resene Quarter Spanish White, large coffee table in Resene Clover, small coffee/side table, cabinet and coffee table tray all in Resene Gravel, plant pot in Resene Gravel with design in Resene Waiouru, tall vase in Resene Black, other vases and accessories painted in Resene Clover, Resene Dingley, Resene Solitaire, Resene Gravel, Resene Biscotti, Resene Thistle and Resene Highland.

FURNISHINGS: Sofa and chair from Contempa, rug from Citta, throw and cushions from Shut the Front Door, candle from Kmart, grey linen-look cushion from The Warehouse, all other are the stylist’s own.

As a colour that features prominently in nature, light olive green can be a great hue both inside and out. Going for a deeper version, such as Resene Waiouru, is ideal in a lounge setting to create a serene, cosy space that is also very on trend.

It’s a colour that’s deep enough that it brings a sense of intimacy without dominating the things around it.

For an interesting twist, break up the uniform green by creating a diagonal batten wall. Paint your battens in Resene Gravel for the lattice-like structure to bring in visual interest and give your room another tactile element.

You could also paint your battens in a lighter colour, like Resene Parchment or Resene Flax, to lift the batten design out of the wall.

Charcoal and gravel greys are popular deep hues and can be used in almost any room, be it your bedroom, kitchen, bathroom, dining room or lounge.

While they can be amazing options as main colours in a room, for a look that is dripping in drama, charcoal and gravel grey also work wonderfully as accent colours.

They pair perfectly with olive green and other shades of grey, adding visual interest and depth to a space. Bring them in by painting your cabinetry, lamp stand or side table, or by layering in soft grey furnishings, like cushions.

 

L-R: Resene Black, Resene Waiouru, Resene Dingley

 


 

The joy of painting: Art Metro


An art school, gallery and supply store, Art Metro helps make Canterbury the creative place it is. Metropol sits down with Malene Reynolds Laugesen to ask a few questions about her teaching role at the Papanui studio.

 

 

WHEN DID YOU BEGIN TEACHING AT ART METRO, AND WHAT BRINGS YOU THE MOST JOB SATISFACTION?
“About two years ago. I mainly teach oil and acrylics and teach three adult evening classes and one children’s afternoon class. Seeing the boost people get when a painting they’ve been struggling with starts to fall into place gives me the most job satisfaction.”

CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE ROOM WHEN EVERYONE’S BUSY AT THEIR EASELS?
“It’s very relaxed. People chat amongst each other, and long-time students are really good at encouraging new students, who are often trying painting for the first time.”

WHEN NOT TUTORING AT ART METRO, YOU’RE FULL-TIME STUDYING AT UC, AND HAVE STARTED THE THIRD YEAR OF YOUR FINE ARTS DEGREE – WHAT’S AHEAD IN FURTHERING YOUR PASSION FOR ART?
“I’ve become fascinated with art history and the idea of curatorial work. I’d like to find a way to continue pursuing these and to find a balance between teaching and my own art practice. I think the two things feed into and complement each other. Painting, for me, creates a deep sense of joy, which I try to bring into teaching. Teaching also compels you to look more closely at your own practice and technique, which is a good challenge.”


Love of landscapes


For Struan Macdonald, art is like second nature to him. And it’s the New Zealand nature such as Mount Aspiring Nation Park, the Otago High Country, Abel Tasman and the West Coast that inspires this landscape painter.

TEKAPO

 

“It can be the afternoon light on a mountain side or some kind of weather effect,” he says.

“With the bush there is incredible variation of colour, density and light which I love to capture.”

Photos and pencil drawings sourced on back country tramping trips are transported to canvas through paint and passion, resulting in a window to the wilderness.

To view his latest work or pieces in progress, like the large diptych of a snowy scene at the head of Lake Tekapo, visit Village Art gallery in Little River or online.


 

Into the wild blue yawn-der: Resene


It’s pretty easy to imagine nodding off in this calm and cool monochromatic lounge.

Styling Kate Alexander | Photography Bryce Carleton *

 

 

*Rug from The Ivy House, armchair from Freedom Furniture, Gidon Bing vase from Mr Bigglesworthy and art by Margaret Petchell from endemicworld.

Watery teals, like the Resene Fast Forward on the console and lamp shade, are a hot trend at the moment and look especially vogueish when mixed with baby blue Resene Mystery and steely Resene Artemis.

The tui print and fish ornaments lend the space a fun bit of fauna flair, while the walnut accents and natural accessories bring warmth and balance out the cool tones.

 

L-R: Resene Mystery, Resene Artemis, Resene Fast Forward, Resene Half Duck Egg Blue.

 

Get inspired at your local Resene ColorShop, www.resene.co.nz/colorshops.


 

Lines, light & rhythm: McAtamney Gallery


Susanna Izard loves the drama of dark skies, the interplay of light and shade, the power of nature, which she describes as “awe inspiring, wonderful and terrible!”

 

When it comes to her paintings, the “three big things” are lines, light and rhythm.

Though working on landscapes for now, Susanna responds to the challenge of anything that catches her eye.

“During lockdown I kept a daily drawing journal and drew things both inside and outside.”

Inspiration is never far away, with Lake Tekapo and the stark, uncompromising beauty of the Mackenzie Country right on Susanna’s doorstep, it’s just a matter of loading the ute with her paints and painting kit and heading on out there.

McAtamney Gallery in Geraldine is hosting Susanna’s exhibition, Clarity and Beauty in a Mad World, on November 11.


 

Simply a-door-able: Resene


A mini mural doesn’t have to be relegated to your walls. It can be on a door, floor, ceiling, dresser or other piece of furniture – and it can even break the boundaries of a single area to spill onto another.

Styling Laura Lynn Johnston | Photography Bryce Carleton

This otherwise neutral entryway has been injected full of personality thanks to a graphic hand-painted mural on the back of the door in Resene Double Foundry, Resene Sante Fe, Resene Dust Storm and Resene Galliano.

And, just by swapping out the background in Resene Double Foundry for Resene Double Alabaster, you can create a totally different look. Another idea is to paint each side of the door in two different colourways using the same palette and pattern.

Make this simple organiser to hold all the accessories you need for your comings and goings by painting a 120cm length of wooden dowel in Resene Double Foundry. Use thick cotton string to create a hanger by wrapping and tying it around the end.

Then, tie one end of several lengths of string and evenly space them along the length of the dowel. Paint a handful of clothes pegs to match your colour scheme and use them to clip lightweight items like hats, gloves and scarves.

Mood board: Background in Resene Quarter Ironsand with A4 drawdown paint swatches (from top to bottom) in Resene Double Foundry, Resene Quarter Bianca, Resene Dust Storm, Resene Galliano and Resene Sante Fe, vases in Resene Galliano (left) and Resene Dust Storm (right), pegs in Resene Sante Fe, Resene Double Foundry and Resene Galliano and hangers in Resene Dust Storm and Resene Double Foundry.

Get inspired at your local Resene ColorShop, www.resene.co.nz/colorshops.


 

Art-tastic!


Christine Green tells us why she’s been such a fan of Art Metro for nearly a decade.

 


What prompted you to enrol at Art Metro, Christine?
As Art Metro wasn’t far from my home, I thought I’d give painting a go. I could hardly draw, let alone paint, but once I started, I was surprised at what I could achieve with help from my tutor and peers.


What’s your preferred medium?
Oils – much easier to fix or blend when I make a mistake!


What about genre?
I’ve done a few animal portraits from photos. I recently painted a landscape, which I really enjoyed.


What keeps you returning to Art Metro?
We’ve a lot of banter. Everyone’s friendly, encouraging and incredibly honest about each other’s works. I enjoy the different age groups. A friend joined a few years ago, so it’s a chance for a catch up.


Who is your tutor?
I started with Livia and I now have Sarah. I couldn’t achieve what I do without them! They can suggest what to try and paint, but over time I have discovered what I do and don’t like to paint and now have definite ideas of what I enjoy doing.


What does painting mean to you personally, Christine?
I paint for my own enjoyment and to gift to friends and family.


Find Art Metro at 465 Papanui Road, phone 03 354 4438 or email learn@artmetro.co.nz.


 

New Neutrals: Resene


Our concept of what a neutral colour looks like is changing. No longer are we talking only about whites, creams, beiges and greys – some surprising new neutrals are in the mix.

 

STYLING BY LISA MORTON, IMAGES BY BRYCE CARLETON

 

Among them are a range of terracotta shades, from subtle apricot tones all the way through to sun-baked clay. While not traditional neutrals, these shades are extremely versatile and work well in lots of – and often unexpected –combinations.

This bedroom is a perfect example of one such surprising but effective combination. Walls in Resene Raindance are given extra drama and interest with graduated layers of terracotta shades; the Resene Just Dance footstool topped with the small vase in pale peach Resene Sorbet, the mid-sized vase in Resene Shilo through to the bold Resene Sunbaked finish of the taller vase and the lightshade. The floor anchors everything with a subtle shade of Resene Colorwood Greywash. The overall result? All the drama and beauty of a desert sunset.

 

Background in Resene Colorwood Greywash. A4 drawdown paint swatches (left to right): Resene Despacito, Resene Just Dance and Resene Raindance. Top vase in Resene Shilo, bottom vase in Resene Sorbet, circle in Resene Sunbaked.

 

Get inspired at your local Resene ColorShop, www.resene.co.nz/colorshops.

 

 


 

Desert Diamond


Not too long ago, this gorgeous mellow-toned room would likely have been awash in millennial pinks, but there’s a subtle shift away from that side of the spectrum into the trendy tones of peaches and nudes.

 

Left diamond: Resene Tequila Left triangles: Resene Just Right Middle diamond: Resene Cashmere Right triangles: Resene Alpaca Floor: Resene Umber White

 

Why use just one peach or nude tone when you can use a few by way of this striking diamond feature wall? Such a dramatic shape can fall into the trap of becoming a bit overwhelming to the eye, however, painted in desert or sunset tones from Resene, this feature wall creates a beautiful and modern backdrop.

To balance out the oversized pattern, a tonal colour scheme keeps it soft and pretty, using sandy, dusky peaches and pinks to create a grown-up look that’s soft but not effeminate.

While shape trends are shifting from strict geometrics to more organic shapes, by using a tonal colour scheme, this pattern avoids being jarring and too contrasting. It’s also much easier to achieve as opposed to more free-form shapes – just mask with tape and get painting!

The scheme is further softened by adding plenty of natural textures to the room, from fringed cushions to macramé wall hangings. Finish off by painting flooring and furniture in natural tones, such as Resene Umber White (floor) and Resene Bone (coffee table).

Other colours to try with sunset shades could be smoky teals, faded blacks and leather browns.

 

Floor in Resene Umber White, medium vase in Resene Tequila, small vase in Resene Alpaca, A4 drawdown paint swatches from bottom Resene Alpaca, Resene Just Right, Resene Cashmere and Resene Tequila. Props: Eden Scarf Blush from Shut The Front Door, Rogue Mini King Protea 56cm Blush Stem and Rogue Protea 55cm Green Stem from Freedom Furniture.

 


Top tip: Keep busy geometric designs to one wall only, and make sure to use the same complementary shades throughout the space. That way the wall will be integrated into the whole room, rather than being jarring or overwhelming. Incorporate it into the room as you would showcase a piece of art.


Get inspired at your local Resene ColorShop, www.resene.co.nz/colorshops.