metropol » exhibition

Tag: exhibition

Nature inspired classy glass


 

Masters in glassblowing and coldwork, Hamish Webster and Greg Swinburne have an exciting new combined display at Christchurch’s Form Gallery, on now until July 30.

 

 

“We are holding only two glass exhibitions this year, and the other one was cast glass,” says gallery manager Ryan Dewsbury. “Compared to other art disciplines there are few glassblowers and the facilities are relatively scarce. With the added skill of coldwork, Greg’s and Hamish’s pieces make for unique work in this country,” he adds.

Webster’s pieces, a mixture of colours and patterns, are reminiscent of the beauty that can be found in nature. He says that his inspiration comes from the environment and a childhood spent living rurally. Having grown up with dyslexia, Webster enjoys using art as way of communicating and connecting with people.

Swinburne’s exhibits represent a period of spiritual searching in his life. Many of his offerings and statues reflect this in the way they seem to be reaching for the heavens.

All the pieces on display have been constructed by hand. Dewsbury explains: “Once the blown glass forms are completed, they are put, while still hot, in a kiln overnight. In the kiln, they cool down at a controlled rate to allow all stress to be relieved. When cold, the sculptures are cut with diamond tools and then there is the long and laborious job of grinding and polishing.”

 


 

Van Gogh-ing places


The borders might be closed, but that isn’t stopping one the world’s most famous and influential artists setting up shop in Christchurch. He may no longer be alive, but Vincent van Gogh’s work will be resurrected in a multi-sensory event.

 

Van Gogh Alive has received rave reviews from around the world, as the artist’s timeless masterpiece are projected onto every surface of an exhibition space – taking viewers quite literally inside the artist’s work.

An evocative classical music score adds even more atmosphere to the event, which showcases thousands of the Dutch artist’s post-impressionist landscapes, still lifes, portraits and self-portraits.

Christchurch is just one of three New Zealand cities to host the event which has been highly acclaimed the world over, receiving kudos from The Guardian, The Sydney Morning Herald, Forbes, and others during tours of Shanghai, Rome, Dubai, Paris and many more.

While much of the world remains in lockdown, not only are local art lovers lucky to attend any public event – but they can also see the European cities which inspired Van Gogh, through his eyes.

Created by Australian Bruce Peterson, the idea came around when he was living in Europe and taking his children to incredible museums, only for them to get bored five minutes in.

Van Gogh Alive has been created to engage audiences of all ages and all levels of interest in art.

Works on display include The Starry Night, his vivid nightscape of the sky from his bedroom in an asylum; a collection of self-portraits; Irises, and many more.

The exhibition includes those inspired by his time spent in Netherlands, Arles, Saint Rémy and Auvers-sur-Oise.

 

Live Nation New Zealand Managing Director Mark Kneebone says the event is for all ages, and has been set-up to allow for contact-free and socially distanced viewing.

“Over six million people around the world have experienced this incredible immersive experience, including sold out seasons across Australia. We can’t wait to share the magic of Van Gogh with Kiwis in 2021.”

On now until March 19 at the Air Force Museum of New Zealand, Wigram. Buy tickets at www.ticketmaster.co.nz.


 

Art show extravaganza: Windsor Gallery


It is a stellar representation from the art world’s finest taking part in the Open Weekend and Art Show on November 7 and 8 at Windsor Gallery, 386 St Asaph Street.

 

With over 130 pieces in the show and over 30 artists represented, from Aotearoa to Dubai, this promises to be one of the most exciting events for lovers of art.

Photographer Andris Apse; sculptors Anneke Bester and Matt Williams; and artists Joel Hart, Bruce Stilwell, Belinda Nadwie, David Woodings, Svetlana Orinko, Philip Beadle and Ivan Button (paying homage to Jackson Pollack), gives an indication of the high calibre of artists being showcased.

Whatever your taste – urban or abstract, photographic or sculptural – this art show speaks to all ages and all periods of life.

For those captivated by an exhibit, be assured every artwork is for sale.

Open 10am to 4pm, Saturday and Sunday November 7 and 8. See online and Facebook below, or
@windsorgallerynz on Instagram.


 

From Marlborough to Mauritius: Windsor Gallery


Outstanding artworks by Anneke Bester and Rhonye McIlroy are showcased in the 18 May – 13 June exhibition at Windsor Gallery.

 

 

A follower of the neo-renaissance movement, Anneke has been painting and sculpting since she was 16 years old.

She has sculpted commercial commissions for hotel projects in South Africa, Mauritius and Dubai (including sculpting eight bronze life-size falcons for the Dubai Mall), and has also sculpted for the Chronicles of Narnia movie. Her exhibition is titled Sister Water.

Rhonye McIlroy’s background was originally fashion based. Her love for fashion, especially the top hat, has become her trademark in most of her paintings since 2011, which detailed many aspects of early New Zealand colonial history.

Current work explores Rhonye’s ancestors John and Elizabeth Guard, pioneers of New Zealand’s shore-based whaling industry in the Marlborough Sounds.

Rhonye’s exhibition is titled Stone to Flesh.

Find Windsor Gallery at 386 St Asaph Street, phone 03 366 0724. Follow Windsor Gallery on Facebook and windsorgallerynz on Instagram.


 

Gauguin in Aotearoa


An exhibition showcasing the works of artists Gabriel Heimler and Anna Proc is soon to open at McAtamney Gallery in Geraldine.

 

 

Titled Gauguin in Aotearoa, the exhibition features a series of paintings inspired by a time when French post-impressionist artist, Paul Gauguin had a ten day stopover in Auckland in 1895, en route to Tahiti.

Gauguin visited the Auckland Museum and, discovering the then newly-opened Māori Art wing, immersed himself in studying and making sketches of the artworks on display.

“Gauguin was a world-citizen; he was half-Peruvian and half-French,” Proc explains.

“He felt himself to be already cosmopolitan and, although he lived in France for some years, he didn’t feel at home there.

Gauguin was searching for a newness, for diversity… he dreamt to find an optimal inspirational place and Tahiti seemed an idyllic destination for his creativity.”

Proc says that, like Gauguin, she and Heimler are from Europe and have been searching for a place that is new and diverse yet also rooted in its history.

“Our inspiration is to ask ourselves what would Gauguin paint if he were here in New Zealand now?

Our work also asks can we choose another country and represent it; interpret this new land – our fascination with Māori culture and that underlying female presence?

Gauguin’s paintings of women are rather mysterious; our big point of difference is that certainly, we want to celebrate and show the beauty and importance of women, but integral to our work is to make them contemporary – of today’s world.”

Heimler and Proc have been painting collaboratively for 10 years.

They work in tandem, from large wall murals through to diptychs. Gauguin in Aotearoa poses many questions, such as why alongside the Polynesian women featured in the series, there are also blue-eyed blondes, sports cars and, somewhat surreally, Heimler, Proc and Gauguin chatting in a doorway!

“In sum, our art is a reflection of our quest to gain a deeper understanding of our single and united selves,” Proc says, “Our work is not didactic; rather, we raise questions. Our process is as much one of exploration as of discovery.”

Find McAtamney Gallery and Design Store at 40a Talbot Street, Geraldine. Phone 027 305 3000 or email carolyn@mcatamneygallery.co.nz.


 

Must-see exhibition


Giant birds and ancient crocodiles are taking over Canterbury Museum these holidays in an exhibition that has to be seen to be believed.

 

Canterbury Museum curators Dr Paul Scofield and Dr Vanesa De Pietri with a life-size model of Mannering’s Penguin, a 1.2 metre penguin that lived around 62 million years ago.

 

Ancient New Zealand: Squawkzilla and the Giants is the result of more than 20 years of collaborative research by scientists working in Central Otago and North Canterbury, to uncover the animals that once roamed our land.

One of the most exciting discoveries was a metre-tall parrot Heracles Inexpectatus – nicknamed Squawkzilla by scientists – which lived in New Zealand about 20 million years ago.

The bones of Squawkzilla, and a life-size model, have been put together for the exhibition, so visitors can now come face-to-face with our past in never-before-seen detail.

Also on display are giant penguins that inhabited the oceans near what is now Waipara more than 60 million years ago. At a Central Otago site with fossils from around 20 million years ago, they uncovered many different types of birds that have never been seen in New Zealand before; bats that walked along the forest floor as well as crocodiles and turtles.

The exhibition runs from 13 December 2019 to 12 July 2020.

“It will be a summer blockbuster,” Museum Director Anthony Wright says.

“We think visitors will be blown away when they see the life-size models of the penguins, the parrot and the crocodile. While the exhibition will be entertaining, it’s grounded in science and we hope people will come away having learnt a little more about the ancient past of Aotearoa New Zealand.