Peri-what?


An expert’s advice on navigating perimenopause.

Lara Briden

As a naturopathic doctor with decades of experience in women’s health, and now the bestselling author of two books, Lara Briden has an incredibly in-depth understanding of menopause and all that comes with it.

Lara’s latest book, Hormone Repair Manual is a practical guide to healthy hormones for women after 40. That means learning how to navigate the change of perimenopause and yes, all the hot flushes, sleepless nights and mood swings it entails. Sadly, with the stigma and shame that often comes with talking about menopause, many women suffer in silence and put up with uncomfortable symptoms for years.

Lara’s clients, however, know that you in fact do not have to suffer through any of the symptoms that appear during perimenopause, which she breaks down throughout Hormone Repair Manual.

 

Here are Lara’s top tips for perimenopause symptoms:

GOODBYE TO WINE O’CLOCK
While its probably not what you want to hear, alcohol is no friend of a woman going through perimenopause. As far as making symptoms worse, alcohol is right up there with one of the easiest ways to do exactly that. Disrupted sleep, triggering hot flushes and dehydration are a few ways alcohol increases discomfort.

MAGNESIUM PLUS TAURINE
These nutrients can be the golden combination for perimenopause. Magnesium boosts the brain’s main calming neurotransmitter, and together with the calming amino acid taurine, the supplements can help regulate sleep, mood and hot flushes.

WORK THOSE MUSCLES
Building muscle strength is very beneficial during perimenopause. Exercise increases the metabolism, as well as supports the brain and body through energy recalibration. Stronger muscles also help with the increased chance of osteoporosis that can occur through menopause.

USE YOUR BODY CLOCK
Our natural sleep-wake cycle, or circadian rhythm is central to our health. This can get disrupted during perimenopause and lead to sleepless nights. There are ways to realign circadian rhythms such as getting out into daylight in the mornings, as well as limiting blue light in the evenings.

 


 

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