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Ivan Iafeta: The Influencers


The opening of the Riverside Market on the corner of Lichfield Street and Oxford Terrace is yet another milestone in the regeneration of our city.

 

Ivan Iafeta
Ivan Iafeta: Regenerate Christchurch CEO

The enclosed, seven-days-a-week market is another reason for residents to spend time in the central city, and also provides exposure for local producers to the thousands of tourists who will come here with the Riverside Market in their itineraries.

The commitment of those behind this development is to be applauded, as is the commitment of other private developers and investors in our city. Their confidence in Ōtautahi Christchurch is something for us all to be heartened and inspired by, particularly in an environment where regeneration challenges remain.

Regenerate Christchurch is committed to working in partnership with other public sector agencies and the private sector to ensure the considerable progress that has been made to date is maximised and new opportunities investigated.

Most recently we have been working with the Canterbury Cricket Trust to develop a proposal to use Section 71 of the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act to amend the Christchurch District Plan to permit changes to the use and operation of Hagley Oval.

We must also remember to celebrate the visible progress that has been made and continues to be made, and I encourage you to make the most of what is on offer at the Riverside Market and in the broader central city area.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Riverside Farmers’ Market comes to life


“We have lived and breathed this project for three years. To see it come to fruition, looking and feeling just as we imagined it, is far more than simply satisfying. It is absolutely thrilling. Now we want the people of Christchurch to love it too.”

 

 

Richard Peebles, Mike Percasky and Kris Inglis – the men behind High St Lanes and Little High Eatery – witnessed the opening of their latest development, the Riverside Farmers’ Market in Christchurch’s city centre, on Monday 30 September.

“We had heard a great deal from overseas about the growth phenomenon that is urban farmers’ markets. Selling local growers’ and producers’ fresh products locally has become a worldwide trend based on the ethics of sustainability and the need to reduce food miles and our carbon footprint. There is a superb example of this concept in Copenhagen that we researched and that convinced us Christchurch was right for a similar venture.”

 

PHOTO: CHRISTCHURCHNZ

 

A development of the scale envisioned right in the heart of the city would not have been possible without the availability of a suitable site. The one viewed as optimal by the property investors was at the intersection of Cashel Mall and Oxford Terrace, occupied by the Container Mall. “This was the beginning of a long process of convincing the right people of the viability of our vision and of eventually negotiating to purchase the site from Ōtākaro Ltd, the Crown-owned company delivering the central city anchor projects.”

 

PHOTO: CHRISTCHURCHNZ

 

An initial concept design with 3D modelling by John Ayres of Creative Studios, Christchurch architectural designers, was modified and tweaked several times. That, along with irrefutable evidence of the benefits of farmers’ markets presented by the three indefatigable partners of the Peebles Group, eventually won the day and the concept could begin to transform into reality. “We demonstrated how much this development could contribute to the regeneration of the central city, to the engagement of Christchurch citizens and to the activation of the entire area.”

 

 

The result is a stunning complex of four buildings interconnected by lanes leading from the Avon River through to Ballantynes. It includes a 3,500 square metre farmers’ market with about 70 vendors and food stalls, as well as laneways with boutique retail businesses. “The complex has a rustic and heritage vibe, reflecting the history of the city and deliberately incorporating recycled materials – rimu, bricks, iron-bark wharf timber, windows, 100-year old wallpaper and even two faces of the clock from the Moorhouse Ave railway station.”

 

PHOTO: CHRISTCHURCHNZ

 

The investors acknowledge that the project could not have eventuated in the way it did without the input of all the consulting firms – DCM Urban Design, Creative Studios, Kirk Roberts, Bonisch Consultants, Novo Group, Holmes Fire, Kirkcaldie Interiors, ThompsonCo, White Associates and the main contractor Consortium Construction. “We have entrusted these specialists with previous developments and once again they have delivered.”

 

PHOTO: CHRISTCHURCHNZ

 

Richard, Mike and Kris want the complex to become the heart of the city, to attract people into town and to keep them there. It won’t be a place purely to buy food and to eat it; it will be a hub, attracting festivals, choirs and events and hosting musicians and handicraft vendors. “We think it is set to become Christchurch’s number one tourist attraction.”